Gateway to US Work Authorization

For many foreign nationals, the American dream begins with a work permit earned through a US visa. Without this, foreigners cannot survive in the land of capitalism.

What every potential immigrant needs to know is that not all visas merit a work permit. Tourist visas—such as an ESTA, or B1 / B2 visas—are out of the question. The same goes for traveling to the U.S. with a passport; a passport is just a waiver “ticket” for citizens of countries in the U.S. Visa Waiver Program.

In some cases, the work permit may be granted, but limited to the type of work or how long you can work. For example, a student visa can lead to a work permit but, holders are limited to work 20 hours a week. Most commonly, a work visa is issued for a specific professional position or for a specific employer in the United States. The H1-B or the Investor Visa (E-2) are examples of “specialized” visas, which come with their own set of limitations on who you can work for. It is also important to be aware that any change in jobs would require a new application. Failing to follow this rule comes with legal consequences. Finally, the family members of visa-holders may be what is known as a “visa-derived beneficiaries” and may also be eligible for a US work permit.

Recent immigration policies have added red tape to the process of getting a US work authorization. The current application processing includes rigorous procedures that an experienced immigration attorney can help navigate. To avoid delays or complications, it is best to hire one of the more seasoned immigration attorneys to facilitate process. Contact Boyer Law Firm, P.L. for a review of your eligibility for a US Work Permit.

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